Qimmivut

The Qimmivut (Our Dogs) workshop introduces Clyde River youth and young adults to Inuit Qaujimajatuqangit (IQ) through dog teaming and land-based hunting and camping trips facilitated by experienced mushers, hunters, and elders.  Musher instructors are paired with youth apprentices for several expeditions to traditional camps of historical and cultural importance.  Traveling by dog team provides an excellent opportunity to transfer IQ, including practical navigation, travel, camping, tool making and harvesting skills.  Participants learn specific skills such as caring for and working with dogs, commands, how to make dog harnesses, leads, whips, and backpacks, safe winter travel and camping, and hunting 

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Youth

Like all Nunavut communities, Clyde River’s population is growing.  The median age in the community is just 21 years, and nearly 50% of the population is under age 20.  Adolescence is a challenging period everywhere.  In Clyde River, youth must deal with a lack of recreational activities, few public places to hang out in together, and a shortage of work opportunities.  Additionally, they struggle with the problem of suicide; every teen in Clyde River has friends and relatives who have committed suicide, and many teens and young adults worry about how to counsel peers with suicidal thoughts or feelings.  Offering 

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Land Based Programming

Inuit culture is rooted in a deep appreciation for the land.  Over time, Inuit have developed many specialized, land-based skills for traveling, hunting, fishing, and living in the beautiful, frozen land and waters of Nunavut.  While Inuit now live in permanent communities and Inuit identity is not limited to land-based knowledge and skill, for many, the land continues to play a central role in their lives.  Often, the land is a place of comfort and familiarity, a place where people can continue to practice the skills and knowledge that have been handed down across generations.  Many Clyde River residents tell 

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